Luke Triton gets a hint. Drawn for an art trade with classyraptor.
Still Eating Oranges

Luke Triton gets a hint. Drawn for an art trade with classyraptor.

Still Eating Oranges

Scouts. Drawn for an art trade with classyraptor.
Still Eating Oranges

Scouts. Drawn for an art trade with classyraptor.

Still Eating Oranges

Excerpt from Scooby-Doo: A New Critical Analysis (forthcoming)

And thus the Mystery Machine manifestly symbolizes the violent pathos of writing. The “gang” ceaselessly divests their enigmatical foes of their native alterity and diminishes them to a repetition of the same, artifacts of representation. The repetitive structure of the series suggests an eternal return, the human destiny of sublation on an infinite scale; but, ironically, no perfect repetitions occur. Even this structure always already is subverted by Dionysian revelry, reflected blatantly in Scooby and Shaggy’s playful, culinary bacchanal. The gang’s Apollonian crusade is problematized; not even essentialist demarcations between man and beast are spared.

Still Eating Oranges

Blue back and black lines 1-3.

Still Eating Oranges

Great television sometimes hides on lesser-known channels. Take Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s fascinating HitRecord on TV, for example, which plays on Pivot. Or take the Audience Network show Off Camera with Sam Jones—the best interview program on American TV. In each episode, Jones talks to a celebrity for one hour, without edits or commercial breaks. His style is relaxed and conversational; and he never talks longer than necessary. The result is light-years ahead of the typical celebrity interview.
Since Off Camera started last year, it has featured the likes of Dave Grohl, Michael B. Jordan and Laura Dern, among others. In Jones’ hands, each person is allowed to show their depth. Jordan describes his attempt in Fruitvale Station to find Oscar Grant in the conflicting anecdotes of Grant’s friends and family—and the advice he received from Forest Whitaker not to consciously imitate any of those anecdotes. From Dern, we learn that the 21st century longing for fame differs radically from her hopes as a 1970s child. And Grohl tells us why his musical idols are disco drummers.
Jones says that he wants to run a magazine, a television studio and a radio station. With Off Camera, he is well on his way. The show is best experienced visually, but it is also released online in text and audio formats, each with certain advantages. Fourteen episodes of Off Camera have been produced to date, and already it has set a new standard in interview programming. Anyone with an interest in the creative process should watch it; and they may find a good starting point embedded after the break.
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Still Eating Oranges

Great television sometimes hides on lesser-known channels. Take Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s fascinating HitRecord on TV, for example, which plays on Pivot. Or take the Audience Network show Off Camera with Sam Jones—the best interview program on American TV. In each episode, Jones talks to a celebrity for one hour, without edits or commercial breaks. His style is relaxed and conversational; and he never talks longer than necessary. The result is light-years ahead of the typical celebrity interview.

Since Off Camera started last year, it has featured the likes of Dave Grohl, Michael B. Jordan and Laura Dern, among others. In Jones’ hands, each person is allowed to show their depth. Jordan describes his attempt in Fruitvale Station to find Oscar Grant in the conflicting anecdotes of Grant’s friends and family—and the advice he received from Forest Whitaker not to consciously imitate any of those anecdotes. From Dern, we learn that the 21st century longing for fame differs radically from her hopes as a 1970s child. And Grohl tells us why his musical idols are disco drummers.

Jones says that he wants to run a magazine, a television studio and a radio station. With Off Camera, he is well on his way. The show is best experienced visually, but it is also released online in text and audio formats, each with certain advantages. Fourteen episodes of Off Camera have been produced to date, and already it has set a new standard in interview programming. Anyone with an interest in the creative process should watch it; and they may find a good starting point embedded after the break.

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